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Result 61 to 80 of 102 total

The evolution of mathematical explorations in open-ended problem-solving situations. (English)
J. Math. Behav. 24, No. 3-4, 302-324 (2005).
Classification: C30 D50
61
Assessing students’ mathematical problem posing. (English)
Teach. Child. Math. 12, No. 3, 129-135 (2005).
Classification: D52 D53
62
Exploring mathematical exploration: how two college students formulated and solved their own mathematical problems. (English)
Focus Learn. Probl. Math. 27, No. 3, 43-72 (2005).
Classification: C30 D50
63
U.S. and Chinese teachers’ constructing, knowing, and evaluating representations to teach mathematics. (English)
Math. Think. Learn. 7, No. 2, 135-169 (2005).
Classification: F93 C33
64
Teaching percent through problem solving in Chinese classrooms. (English)
Ohio J. Sch. Math. 2004, No. 50, 10-14 (2004).
Classification: F80 D50 F90
65
Developing ratio concepts: an Asian perspective. (English)
Math. Teach. Middle Sch. 9, No. 7, 362-367 (2004).
Classification: F83 D13 U23
66
How Chinese learn mathematics. Perspectives from insiders. (English)
World Scientific Publishing Co., Singapore (ISBN 978-981-256-014-8). 590 p. (2004).
Classification: D30 B10 D10
67
How do Chinese learn mathematics? Some evidence-based insights and needed directions. (English)
Fan, Lianghuo et al., How Chinese learn mathematics. Perspectives from insiders. World Scientific Publishing Co., Singapore (ISBN 978-981-256-014-8). 535-554 (2004).
Classification: D10 B10 C30
68
Thinking mathematically by Chinese learners: a cross-national comparative perspective. (English)
Fan, Lianghuo et al., How Chinese learn mathematics. Perspectives from insiders. World Scientific Publishing Co., Singapore (ISBN 978-981-256-014-8). 71-106 (2004).
Classification: C30 D50 D10 B10
69
Why do U.S. and Chinese students think differently in mathematical problem solving? Impact of early algebra learning and teachers’ beliefs. (English)
J. Math. Behav. 23, No. 2, 135-167 (2004).
Classification: D53 C33 C23
70
Developing algebraic thinking in the earlier grades: a case study of the Chinese elementary school curriculum. (English)
Math. Educ. 8, No. 1, 107-130 (2004).
Classification: D32
71
Developing algebraic thinking in the earlier grades: a case study of the U.S. Investigations curriculum. (English)
Math. Educ. 8, No. 1, 6-38 (2004).
Classification: D32
72
What research tells us about teaching mathematics through problem solving. (English)
Lester, Frank K. Jr., Teaching mathematics through problem solving. National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM), Reston, VA (ISBN 0-87353-540-5). 241-253 (2003).
Classification: D52 D32
73
Investigating parental roles in students’ learning of mathematics from a cross-national perspective. (English)
Math. Educ. Res. J. 15, No. 2, 87-106 (2003).
Classification: C60 C90
74
A perspective for examining the link between problem posing and problem solving. (English)
Pateman, Neil A. et al., Proceedings of the 27th Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education held jointly with the 25th Conference of PME-NA. Vol. 3. ,. 103-110 (2003).
Classification: D53 C33
75
Singaporean students’ mathematical thinking in problem solving and problem posing. An exploratory study. (English)
Int. J. Math. Educ. Sci. Technol. 34, No. 5, 719-737 (2003).
Classification: C33
76
Generalized and generative thinking in US and Chinese students’ mathematical problem solving and problem posing. (English)
J. Math. Behav. 21, No. 4, 401-421 (2002).
Classification: D53
77
Teachers’ conceptions and constructions of pedagogical representations in teaching arithmetic average. (English)
Phillips, Brian, ICOTS 6. Proceedings of the Sixth international conference on teaching statistics, Cape Town, Sout Africa, July 7‒12, 2002. (ISBN 0-85590-782-7). 6 p. (2002).
Classification: K40
78
Intended treatments of arithmetic average in U.S. and Asian school mathematics textbooks. (English)
Sch. Sci. Math. 102, No. 8, 391-404 (2002).
Classification: D33 K43 U23
79
Mathematical thinking involved in U.S. and Chinese students’ solving of process-constrained and process-open problems. (English)
Math. Think. Learn. 2, No. 4, 309-340 (2000).
Classification: D63
80

Result 61 to 80 of 102 total

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